Today’s Panchang: Shubh Muhurat & Date, Tithi, Nakshatra, and More

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The Panchang is a complex and fascinating system that has been used for centuries to determine the most auspicious times for important life events, such as weddings, business transactions, and religious ceremonies and is steeped in rich cultural and astrological significance.

But what exactly is the Panchang, and how does it work? Simply put, the Panchang is a comprehensive astrological guide that includes information about the positions of the sun, moon, and planets, as well as the lunar month and tithi (lunar day). By analyzing this data, astrologers are able to determine the most auspicious times for a variety of activities, such as weddings, business transactions, and religious ceremonies.

But the Panchang is more than just a calendar – it is also a way of understanding the cosmic forces that shape our lives and the world around us. According to Hindu belief, the movements of the celestial bodies have a powerful influence on the events and circumstances of our lives, and the Panchang helps us to understand and navigate this complex web of interconnected forces.

So whether you’re an astrology enthusiast looking to deepen your understanding of the Panchang, or simply curious about this fascinating system, we hope you’ll find this introduction both engaging and informative. In the following sections, we’ll delve deeper into the components of the Panchang, its uses and significance, and its rich history and cultural significance. So, let’s begin our journey into the world of Panchang and discover the many ways in which this ancient system can help us to navigate the complexities of life.

Today Panchang


Today Panchang February 4, 2023  

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Panchang February 4, 2023 – New Delhi
Today Date – Panchang February 4, 2023 
Sunrise — 9:53 AM – 11:14 AM 🌞
Sunset — 1:55 PM – 3:16 PM 🔆
Moonrise — 7:11 AM – 8:32 AM 🌞
Moonset — Feb 05 7:03 AM 🔆
Day — Shaniwar (Saturday)
– Tithi –
Sukla Paksha Chaturdashi  

Feb 03 06:58 PM – Feb 04 09:30 PM

Sukla Paksha Purnima  

Feb 04 09:30 PM – Feb 05 11:58 PM

– Nakshatra –
Punarvasu

Feb 03 06:18 AM – Feb 04 09:16 AM

Pushya

Feb 04 09:16 AM – Feb 05 12:13 PM

– Yoga –
Prithi

Feb 03 01:01 PM – Feb 04 01:52 PM

Ayushman

Feb 04 01:52 PM – Feb 05 02:41 PM

– Karana –
Garija

Feb 03 06:58 PM – Feb 04 08:14 AM

Vanija

Feb 04 08:14 AM – Feb 04 09:30 PM

Vishti

Feb 04 09:30 PM – Feb 05 10:45 AM


Today Panchang Auspicious & Inauspicious Time

Panchang is a traditional Hindu calendar that is used to determine the auspicious and inauspicious periods for various activities and events. The auspicious periods, also known as “Shubh Muhurtam” are believed to be times when the planetary positions are favorable and can bring positive influences and blessings. These periods are typically considered good for starting new ventures, performing religious ceremonies, or making important decisions.

Panchang February 4, 2023 – Auspicious Time

Abhijit Muhurat

12:13 PM – 12:56 PM

Amrit Kaal

05:02 AM – 06:49 AM

Brahma Muhurat

05:35 AM – 06:23 AM

Panchang February 4, 2023 – Inauspicious Time

Rahu

9:53 AM – 11:14 AM

Yamaganda

1:55 PM – 3:16 PM

Gulika

7:11 AM – 8:32 AM

Dur Muhurat

08:37 AM – 09:21 AM

Varjyam

06:15 PM – 08:03 PM

On the other hand, the inauspicious periods, also known as “Rahu Kalam” or “Dur Muhurtam,” are believed to be times when the planetary positions are not favorable and can bring negative influences and challenges. These periods are typically avoided for starting new ventures, performing religious ceremonies, or making important decisions. It is believed that engaging in activities during inauspicious periods can lead to difficulties or setbacks.

Panchang is used by Hindus to guide their daily lives and to make important decisions based on astrological calculations and the positions of the planets.

About Panchang


Panchang is a traditional Hindu calendar that is used to determine the most auspicious times for various rituals and ceremonies. It includes detailed information about the positions of the sun, moon, and planets, as well as the lunar month and the tithi (lunar day). The panchang is used by astrologers to calculate the horoscope, or birth chart, of an individual, and to determine the most favorable times for activities such as weddings, business transactions, and religious ceremonies.

It is based on the Vedic system of astrology and is used in Hindu communities around the world. The panchang is considered to be an important tool for understanding the movements of the celestial bodies and their influence on our lives. It is an integral part of Hindu culture and is widely used to guide important decisions and navigate the complexities of life.

The Panchang is typically divided into five main components:

Tithi: The lunar day according to the Hindu lunar calendar.

Nakshatra: The lunar mansion or constellation in which the moon is located on a particular day.

Yoga: The combination of the sun and moon’s positions in the sky.

Karana: Half of a tithi, representing the time it takes for the moon to move from one lunar mansion to the next.

Vaara: The day of the week according to the Hindu calendar.

In addition to these five main components, the Panchang may also include information about the positions of the planets, the sunrise and sunset times, the zodiac signs, and other astrological aspects. It is used as a reference by Hindus to determine the most auspicious times for various activities and rituals.

Here are a few more details about the five main components of the Panchang:

1. Tithi:

Tithis are lunar days that begin at the moment the moon and sun are exactly 12 degrees apart in the sky. There are 30 tithis in a lunar month, and each tithi lasts for about 24 hours. Tithis are used to determine the most auspicious times for various rituals and ceremonies.

2. Nakshatra:

Nakshatras are lunar mansions or constellations that are used to divide the sky into 27 equal parts. The moon moves through one nakshatra every day, and there are 28 nakshatras in total. Each nakshatra is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times.

3. Yoga:

Yogas are the combination of the sun and moon’s positions in the sky. There are 27 yogas in total, and each yoga is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times.

4. Karana:

Karanas are half of a tithi, representing the time it takes for the moon to move from one lunar mansion to the next. There are 11 karanas in total, and each karana is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times.

5. Vaara:

Vaaras are the days of the week according to the Hindu calendar. There are seven vaaras in total, and each vaara is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times.

Types of Tithi

There are 15 Tithis in a lunar month, and they are divided into two categories: Shukla Paksha and Krishna Paksha.

Shukla Paksha: Shukla Paksha is the bright lunar fortnight, during which the moon is waxing. This period begins with the new moon and ends with the full moon. The Tithis during this period are called Shukla Tithis.

Krishna Paksha: Krishna Paksha is the dark lunar fortnight, during which the moon is waning. This period begins with the full moon and ends with the new moon. The Tithis during this period are called Krishna Tithis.

Each Tithi is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various rituals and ceremonies based on the Tithi that is prevailing on the day.

Here are the names of the 15 Tithis and the deities they are associated with:

  1. Pratipada: Lord Brahma
  2. Dwitiya: Goddess Laxmi
  3. Tritiya: Lord Agni (fire)
  4. Chaturthi: Lord Brahma
  5. Panchami: Goddess Saraswati
  6. Shashthi: Lord Kartikeya (son of Lord Shiva)
  7. Saptami: Lord Rama
  8. Ashtami: Goddess Durga
  9. Navami: Lord Vishnu
  10. Dashami: Lord Shiva
  11. Ekadashi: Lord Vishnu
  12. Dwadashi: Lord Krishna
  13. Trayodashi: Lord Krishna
  14. Chaturdashi: Lord Shiva
  15. Amavasya: Lord Yama (god of death)

It is believed that performing certain rituals and ceremonies on the day of the Tithi that is associated with a particular deity can bring blessings and positive energy from that deity. Therefore, Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Tithi that is prevailing on the day.

Types of Nakshatra

There are 28 Nakshatras, or lunar mansions, in Hindu astrology. They are divided into four quarters, or padas, and each Nakshatra is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Here is a list of the 28 Nakshatras and the deities they are associated with:

  1. Ashwini: Ashwini Kumaras (twin sons of the sun god)
  2. Bharani: Yama (god of death)
  3. Krittika: Agni (fire)
  4. Rohini: Brahma
  5. Mrigashirsha: Soma (moon)
  6. Ardra: Rudra (a form of Shiva)
  7. Punarvasu: Aditi (mother of the gods)
  8. Pushya: Brihaspati (teacher of the gods)
  9. Ashlesha: Sarpas (serpents)
  10. Magha: Pitrs (ancestors)
  11. Purva Phalguni: Bhaga (god of wealth)
  12. Uttara Phalguni: Aryaman (god of nobility)
  13. Hasta: Savitri (sun)
  14. Chitra: Vishvakarma (divine architect)
  15. Swati: Vayu (wind)
  16. Vishakha: Indra (king of the gods)
  17. Anuradha: Mitra (friendship)
  18. Jyeshtha: Aryaman (god of nobility)
  19. Mula: Nirriti (goddess of destruction)
  20. Purva Ashadha: Apah (water)
  21. Uttara Ashadha: Vishnu
  22. Shravana: Vishnu
  23. Dhanishtha: Vasus (eight celestial deities)
  24. Shatabhisha: Varuna (god of the sky and water)
  25. Purva Bhadrapada: Aja Ekapada (a form of Shiva)
  26. Uttara Bhadrapada: Ahir Budhnya (serpent of the depths)
  27. Revati: Pushan (protector of flocks)
  28. Abhijit: Lord Vishnu

Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Nakshatra that is prevailing on the day.

Types of Yoga

Yoga is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the combination of the sun and moon’s positions in the sky. There are 27 Yogas in total, and each Yoga is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Here is a list of the 27 Yogas and the deities they are associated with:

  1. Vishkambha: Lord Vishnu
  2. Priti: Goddess Laxmi
  3. Ayushman: Lord Vishnu
  4. Saubhagya: Goddess Laxmi
  5. Sobhana: Lord Brahma
  6. Atiganda: Lord Shiva
  7. Sukarma: Lord Vishnu
  8. Dhrithi: Lord Shiva
  9. Shoola: Lord Rudra
  10. Ganda: Lord Shiva
  11. Vriddhi: Lord Brahma
  12. Dhruva: Lord Vishnu
  13. Vyaghata: Lord Shiva
  14. Harshana: Lord Brahma
  15. Vajra: Lord Indra
  16. Siddhi: Lord Vishnu
  17. Vyatipata: Lord Shiva
  18. Variyan: Lord Vishnu
  19. Parigha: Lord Shiva
  20. Shiva: Lord Shiva
  21. Siddha: Lord Vishnu
  22. Sadhya: Lord Brahma
  23. Subha: Lord Vishnu
  24. Shubha: Lord Brahma
  25. Shukla: Lord Vishnu
  26. Brahma: Lord Brahma
  27. Indra: Lord Indra

Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Yoga that is prevailing on the day.

Types of Karana

Karana is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to half of a tithi, representing the time it takes for the moon to move from one lunar mansion (nakshatra) to the next. There are 11 Karanas in total, and each Karana is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Here is a list of the 11 Karanas and the deities they are associated with:

  1. Baava: Lord Vishnu
  2. Balava: Lord Shiva
  3. Kaulava: Lord Brahma
  4. Taitila: Lord Vishnu
  5. Gara: Lord Shiva
  6. Vanija: Lord Brahma
  7. Vishti: Lord Vishnu
  8. Sakuna: Lord Shiva
  9. Chatushpada: Lord Brahma
  10. Nagava: Lord Vishnu
  11. Kimstughna: Lord Shiva

Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Karana that is prevailing on the day.

Types of Vaara

Vaara is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the days of the week according to the Hindu calendar. There are seven Vaaras in total, and each Vaara is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Here is a list of the seven Vaaras and the deities they are associated with:

  1. Ravi Vaara (Sunday): Lord Surya (sun)
  2. Somvaara (Monday): Lord Chandra (moon)
  3. Mangalvaara (Tuesday): Lord Mangal (Mars)
  4. Budhvaara (Wednesday): Lord Budha (Mercury)
  5. Guruvaara (Thursday): Lord Brihaspati (Jupiter)
  6. Shukravaara (Friday): Lord Shukra (Venus)
  7. Shanivaara (Saturday): Lord Shani (Saturn)

Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Vaara that is prevailing on the day.

What is Rashi And Types of Rashi

Rashi is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the zodiac sign that the moon is in at the time of a person’s birth. There are 12 Rashis in total, and each Rashi is associated with a particular sign of the zodiac and has its own set of characteristics and traits. Here is a list of the 12 Rashis and the signs of the zodiac they are associated with:

  1. Mesha Rashi (Aries): March 21 – April 19
  2. Vrishabha Rashi (Taurus): April 20 – May 20
  3. Mithuna Rashi (Gemini): May 21 – June 20
  4. Karka Rashi (Cancer): June 21 – July 22
  5. Simha Rashi (Leo): July 23 – August 22
  6. Kanya Rashi (Virgo): August 23 – September 22
  7. Tula Rashi (Libra): September 23 – October 22
  8. Vrishchika Rashi (Scorpio): October 23 – November 21
  9. Dhanu Rashi (Sagittarius): November 22 – December 21
  10. Makara Rashi (Capricorn): December 22 – January 19
  11. Kumbha Rashi (Aquarius): January 20 – February 18
  12. Meena Rashi (Pisces): February 19 – March 20

Each Rashi is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Rashi that is prevailing on the day.

What is Ritu And Types of Ritu

Ritu is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the six seasons of the year. These seasons are determined by the movement of the sun and are based on the traditional Indian calendar. The six Ritus are as follows:

  1. Vasanta Ritu (Spring): March – April
  2. Grishma Ritu (Summer): May – June
  3. Varsha Ritu (Monsoon): July – August
  4. Sharad Ritu (Autumn): September – October
  5. Hemanta Ritu (Pre-winter): November – December
  6. Shishira Ritu (Winter): January – February

Each Ritu is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Ritu that is prevailing on the day.

In addition to the six Ritus, there is also a seventh Ritu called “Malma Ritu,” which is a transitional period between the end of one Ritu and the beginning of the next. During this time, the weather is usually changing and can be unpredictable. Malma Ritu is considered to be an inauspicious time for most activities and is generally avoided for important events and ceremonies.

What is Ayana And Types of Ayana

Ayana is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the two halves of the year, determined by the position of the sun in relation to the earth. The two Ayanas are as follows:

  1. Uttarayana: This is the half of the year during which the sun is moving northward. It is considered to be an auspicious time for performing certain rituals and ceremonies. Uttarayana begins on the winter solstice and lasts until the summer solstice.
  2. Dakshinayana: This is the half of the year during which the sun is moving southward. It is generally considered to be an inauspicious time for performing certain rituals and ceremonies. Dakshinayana begins on the summer solstice and lasts until the winter solstice.

Each Ayana is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Ayana that is prevailing on the day.

What is Auspicious Muhurta

Auspicious muhurta, also known as “shubh muhurta” refers to a specific time that is considered to be particularly favorable or lucky for performing certain activities. In Hindu astrology, the Panchang is used to determine the most auspicious muhurtas for various events and ceremonies.

There are many factors that are taken into consideration when determining the most auspicious muhurta for an activity, including the position of the sun, moon, and other planets in the sky; the tithi, nakshatra, yoga, karana, vaara, and rashi that are prevailing on the day; and the ritu and ayana that are currently in effect. All of these factors can have an influence on the energy and auspiciousness of a particular time.

In Hindu astrology, muhurta refers to a specific time that is considered to be particularly favorable or lucky for performing certain activities. There are many different types of muhurtas that can be determined using the Panchang, the traditional Hindu calendar that is used to determine the most favorable times for various events and ceremonies. Some examples of the types of muhurtas that can be determined using the Panchang include:

Auspicious muhurta: This is a muhurta that is considered to be particularly favorable or lucky for performing certain activities. It is believed that performing certain activities during an auspicious muhurta can bring good luck and positive energy, while performing the same activities during an inauspicious muhurta can bring negative energy and bad luck.

Inauspicious muhurta: This is a muhurta that is considered to be particularly unfavorable or unlucky for performing certain activities. It is generally believed that it is best to avoid performing important activities during an inauspicious muhurta.

List of Shubh Muhurat

There are many different types of shubh muhurats that can be determined using the Panchang, the traditional Hindu calendar that is used to determine the most favorable times for various events and ceremonies. Some examples of the names of shubh muhurats that can be determined using the Panchang include:

1. Abhijit Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs during the period of time when the sun is in the middle of the sky. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

2. Amrita Kalasha Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies. It is believed to bring blessings and positive energy to the activity being performed.

3. Brahma Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs just before sunrise. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

4. Chandrashtama Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the moon is in a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

5. Gauri Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies related to the goddess Gauri.

6. Guru Muhurta: Guru Muhurta is considered to be a particularly auspicious time for starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies. It is believed that performing certain activities during Guru Muhurta can bring good luck and positive energy

7. Shubh Lagna Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the ascendant, or the rising sign, is in a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

8. Shubh Tithi Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the tithi, or lunar day, is in a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

9. Shubh Vaara Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs on a particular day of the week. Some vaaras, or days of the week, are considered to be more auspicious than others for performing certain activities.

10. Shubh Yoga Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the yoga, or the position of the sun and moon in the sky, is in a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

11. Shubh Nakshatra Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the nakshatra, or lunar mansion, is in a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

12. Shubh Karana Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the karana, or half of a lunar day, is in a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

13. Shubh Rashi Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when the rashi, or astrological sign, is in a particular position in the sky. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

14. Shubh Ritu Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs during a particular ritu, or season of the year. Some seasons are considered to be more auspicious than others for performing certain activities.

15. Shubh Ayana Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs during a particular ayana, or half of the year during which the sun is moving in a particular direction. Some ayanas are considered to be more auspicious than others for performing certain activities.

16. Shubh Graha Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular planet, or graha, is in a particular position in the sky. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

17. Shubh Hora Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs during a particular hora, or one-twelfth of a day. Some horas are considered to be more auspicious than others for performing certain activities.

18. Shubh Dasha Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs during a particular dasha, or planetary period, in a person’s astrological chart. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain activities that are related to the planet that is ruling the dasha.

19. Shubh Gochara Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular planet is in a particular position in relation to the natal chart of a person. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain activities that are related to the planet that is in gochara.

20. Shubh Samvatsara Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs during a particular samvatsara, or Hindu solar year. Some samvatsaras are considered to be more auspicious than others for performing certain activities.

21. Shubh Tithi Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular tithi, or lunar day, begins. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

22. Shubh Nakshatra Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular nakshatra, or lunar mansion, begins. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

23. Shubh Vaara Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular vaara, or day of the week, begins. Some vaaras are considered to be more auspicious than others for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

24. Shubh Rashi Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular rashi, or astrological sign, begins. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

25. Shubh Ritu Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular ritu, or season of the year, begins. Some seasons are considered to be more auspicious than others for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

26. Shubh Ayana Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular ayana, or half of the year during which the sun is moving in a particular direction, begins. Some ayanas are considered to be more auspicious than others for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

27. Shubh Gochara Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular planet enters a particular position in relation to the natal chart of a person. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain activities that are related to the planet that is in gochara.

28. Shubh Samvatsara Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular samvatsara, or Hindu solar year, begins. Some samvatsaras are considered to be more auspicious than others for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

29. Shubh Graha Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular planet enters a particular astrological sign. It is considered to be particularly auspicious for performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

30. Shubh Hora Pravesh Muhurta: This is a shubh muhurat that occurs when a particular hora, or one-twelfth of a day, begins. Some horas are considered to be more auspicious than others for starting new ventures and for making important decisions.

What is Inauspicious Muhurta

In Hindu astrology, ashubh muhurats, or inauspicious times, are considered to be times that are not favorable for starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies. In the Panchang, or traditional Hindu calendar, there are many different types of ashubh muhurats that can be determined based on various astrological influences.

Ashubh muhurats are believed to bring negative energy and bad luck, while shubh muhurats, or auspicious times, are believed to bring good luck and positive energy. Hindus often consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities.

Here are a few more examples of ashubh muhurats that can be determined using the Panchang:

Rahu Kalam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the planet Rahu in the sky.

Yama Gandam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the planet Yama in the sky.

Varjyam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the sun and the moon in the sky.

Durmuhurtam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the planets in the sky.

In general, it is believed that performing certain activities during ashubh muhurats can bring negative energy and bad luck, while performing the same activities during shubh muhurats can bring good luck and positive energy. Hindus often consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities.

Why is Panchangam important?

The Panchang, also known as the Hindu calendar, is an important tool for Hindus for determining the most auspicious times for various activities. The Panchang is based on the movements of the sun, moon, and planets, and it is used to determine the most favorable times for activities such as starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies.

The Panchang is divided into several different parts, including the Tithi, or lunar day; the Nakshatra, or lunar mansion; the Yoga, or combination of the sun and moon; the Karana, or half lunar day; the Vaara, or day of the week; and the Rashi, or zodiac sign. Each of these parts is influenced by the movements of the sun, moon, and planets, and they are used to determine the most auspicious times for various activities.

Hindus often consult the Panchang to determine the most favorable times for starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies. The Panchang is also used to determine the dates of Hindu festivals and holidays, and it is an important tool for Hindus for planning and organizing their daily activities.

In general, the Panchang is an important aspect of Hindu culture and tradition, and it is widely used by Hindus in India and around the world to determine the most auspicious times for various activities.

What is today panchang?

The Panchang is a traditional Hindu calendar that is based on the movements of the sun, moon, and planets, and it is used to determine the most auspicious times for various activities. It is divided into several different parts, including the Tithi, or lunar day; the Nakshatra, or lunar mansion; the Yoga, or combination of the sun and moon; the Karana, or half lunar day; the Vaara, or day of the week; and the Rashi, or zodiac sign.

What is today auspicious Muhurat?

Shubh muhurats, or auspicious times, are considered to be times that are favorable for starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies. These times are determined based on the movements of the sun, moon, and planets, and they are believed to bring good luck and positive energy.

What is today Inauspicious Muhurat?

In Hindu astrology, ashubh muhurats, or inauspicious times, are considered to be times that are not favorable for starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies. These times are determined based on the movements of the sun, moon, and planets, and they are believed to bring negative energy and bad luck.

What is today Abhijit Muhurat?

Abhijit Muhurat is a specific period of time during the day that is considered to be particularly auspicious for starting new ventures and making important decisions. It is determined based on the position of the sun and the moon in the sky, and it is believed to bring good luck and positive energy.

What is today Rahu Kalam?

Rahu Kalam is a specific period of time during the day that is considered to be particularly inauspicious and unlucky, according to Hindu astrology. It is determined based on the position of the planet Rahu in the sky, and it is believed to bring negative energy and bad luck.

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