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Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Today Panchang

Don't underestimate the power of the Panchang. So start your day off right with Today Panchang.

Are you looking to start your day at an auspicious Time? Look no further than Today Panchang, your daily guide to Hindu astrology and calendar. As a vital aspect of Vedic astrology, the Panchang provides detailed information about the position of the Sun and Moon, auspicious and inauspicious timings, planetary positions, and most fasting days and festivals in the year.

But Today Panchang is more than just a calendar. It is your key to finding the right time to start a new or propitious task. Want to perform a Griha Pravesh or enter your new vehicle on an auspicious day? Consult the Panchang and find the perfect Vehicle Purchase Muhurat or Griha Pravesh Muhurat. Are you planning a wedding or a Namkaran ceremony? Look up the Marriage Muhurat or Namkaran Muhurat to ensure a successful and happy event.

But that’s not all. The Today Panchang also offers information about Hindu Vrat, Hindu Festival, Hindu Puja, and Hindu Mantra, allowing you to deepen your spiritual practice and connect with your culture and heritage.

Don’t underestimate the power of the Panchang. By consulting this ancient guide, you can ensure that your actions are aligned with the cosmic energies of the universe, leading to greater success and happiness in all areas of your life. So start your day off right with Today Panchang, your daily dose of Hindu astrology and calendar.

Today Panchang

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Find Today’s Panchang for Your City


Panchang is a traditional Hindu calendar used to determine auspicious timings for important occasions, festivals, ceremonies, and other events. Our website provides Panchang information based on different locations. If you’re looking to check the Panchang for your city, state, or country, simply provide your information and check out your location’s Panchang for today.

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About Panchangam

Today Panchang is a Hindu calendar used to determine the auspicious timings for Muhurat in a day. The term “Panchang” is derived from the Sanskrit language, meaning “Five Limbs (parts).” It refers to the five elements of the calendar: Thithi, Nakshatra, Yoga, Karana, and Vara (weekday).

The Panchang has been in use in Hindu culture for centuries and is believed to have originated during the Vedic period. It is a Hindu almanac and calendar used to track important dates and their calculations in a tabulated form.

Panchang plays a significant role in choosing the right day and time for performing rituals in traditional Hindu society. Each element of the Panchang is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times.

Thithi refers to the lunar day, Nakshatra refers to the position of the moon in one of the 27 lunar mansions, Yoga refers to the combination of the sun and moon’s positions in the sky, Karana refers to half of a Thithi, and Vara refers to the weekday.

The Panchang is used by astrologers for different calculations and predictions, including predicting auspicious times for starting new projects, making investments, and performing religious rituals.

Today Panchang provides daily Panchang details for various cities across the globe, making it easier for people to access this information and plan their activities accordingly, including Thithi, Vara, Nakshatra, Yoga, Karana, Sun & Moon Timing, Inauspicious Period, Auspicious Period & More.

Panchang is a Hindu calendar that provides information about various astronomical and astrological details related to a particular day. The five main components of Panchang are Thithi, Vara, Nakshatra, Yoga, and Karana. Here’s what you need to know about each of them.


Tithi


Thithi is the lunar day in the Hindu calendar, which is based on the phase of the Moon. There are 30 Thithis in a lunar month. Each Thithi has a particular significance and is believed to influence the energy and mood of the day. Thithi is important in determining auspicious dates for ceremonies and events.

There are 30 Tithis in a lunar month, and they are divided into two categories: Shukla Paksha and Krishna Paksha.

Shukla Paksha: Shukla Paksha is the bright lunar fortnight, during which the moon is waxing. This period begins with the new moon and ends with the full moon. The Tithis during this period are called Shukla Tithis.

Krishna Paksha: Krishna Paksha is the dark lunar fortnight, during which the moon is waning. This period begins with the full moon and ends with the new moon. The Tithis during this period are called Krishna Tithis. Here’s what you need to know about each of the 30 Thithis:

Pratipada: The first Thithi of the lunar month, Pratipada is associated with new beginnings, starting new projects, and laying foundations.

Dwitiya: The second Thithi, Dwitiya is associated with wealth, prosperity, and growth. It is a good day for making financial investments.

Tritiya: The third Thithi, Tritiya is associated with courage, strength, and power. It is a good day for starting physical activities and exercise.

Chaturthi: The fourth Thithi, Chaturthi is associated with stability, security, and protection. It is a good day for seeking blessings from deities.

Panchami: The fifth Thithi, Panchami is associated with knowledge, learning, and wisdom. It is a good day for education and acquiring new skills.

Shashti: The sixth Thithi, Shashti is associated with victory, success, and triumph. It is a good day for starting new projects and making important decisions.

Saptami: The seventh Thithi, Saptami is associated with creativity, innovation, and originality. It is a good day for artistic and creative pursuits.

Ashtami: The eighth Thithi, Ashtami is associated with strength, courage, and valor. It is a good day for physical activities and sports.

Navami: The ninth Thithi, Navami is associated with spiritual growth, devotion, and worship. It is a good day for seeking blessings from deities.

Dashami: The tenth Thithi, Dashami is associated with strength, courage, and bravery. It is a good day for starting new ventures and making important decisions.

Ekadashi: The eleventh Thithi, Ekadashi is associated with spiritual growth, self-discipline, and austerity. It is a good day for fasting and meditation.

Dwadashi: The twelfth Thithi, Dwadashi is associated with purity, cleanliness, and sanctity. It is a good day for performing rituals and spiritual activities.

Trayodashi: The thirteenth Thithi, Trayodashi is associated with harmony, balance, and peace. It is a good day for seeking reconciliation and forgiveness.

Chaturdashi: The fourteenth Thithi, Chaturdashi is associated with strength, courage, and valor. It is a good day for performing rituals and seeking blessings from deities.

Purnima: The fifteenth Thithi, Purnima is associated with completion, fulfillment, and abundance. It is a good day for celebrating and expressing gratitude.

Pratipada: The first Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Pratipada is associated with new beginnings, starting new projects, and laying foundations.

Dwitiya: The second Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Dwitiya is associated with wealth, prosperity, and growth. It is a good day for making financial investments.

Tritiya: The third Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Tritiya is associated with courage, strength, and power. It is a good day for starting physical activities and exercise.

Chaturthi: The fourth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Chaturthi is associated with stability, security, and protection. It is a good day for seeking blessings from deities.

Panchami: The fifth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Panchami is associated with knowledge, learning, and wisdom. It is a good day for education and acquiring new skills.

Shashti: The sixth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Shashti is associated with victory, success, and triumph. It is a good day for starting new projects and making important decisions.

Saptami: The seventh Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Saptami is associated with creativity, innovation, and originality. It is a good day for artistic and creative pursuits.

Ashtami: The eighth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Ashtami is associated with strength, courage, and valor. It is a good day for physical activities and sports.

Navami: The ninth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Navami is associated with spiritual growth, devotion, and worship. It is a good day for seeking blessings from deities.

Dashami: The tenth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Dashami is associated with strength, courage, and bravery. It is a good day for starting new ventures and making important decisions.

Ekadashi: The eleventh Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Ekadashi is associated with spiritual growth, self-discipline, and austerity. It is a good day for fasting and meditation.

Dwadashi: The twelfth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Dwadashi is associated with purity, cleanliness, and sanctity. It is a good day for performing rituals and spiritual activities.

Trayodashi: The thirteenth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Trayodashi is associated with harmony, balance, and peace. It is a good day for seeking reconciliation and forgiveness.

Chaturdashi: The fourteenth Thithi of the second half of the lunar month, Chaturdashi is associated with strength, courage, and valor. It is a good day for performing rituals and seeking blessings from deities.

Amavasya: The fifteenth and final Thithi of the lunar month, Amavasya is associated with introspection, reflection, and spiritual renewal. It is a good day for performing rituals and seeking guidance from spiritual teachers.

These are the 30 Thithis that make up the lunar month in the Hindu calendar. Each Thithi has a specific energy and significance, and they are used to determine auspicious times for various activities and events. Understanding the Thithis can help in planning and scheduling important events and activities in one’s life.


Vara


Vara is the day of the week, which is determined by the position of the Sun in the zodiac. There are seven Vara in a week, each associated with a particular planet. Each Vara is believed to have a different energy, and people may follow certain rituals or avoid certain activities based on the Vara of the day. Here is a brief overview of each day of the week and its associated planet.

Sunday (Ravi Vara): Sunday is associated with the Sun (Surya) and is considered a day of power, vitality, and energy. It is a good day for starting new projects and pursuing creative endeavors.

Monday (Soma Vara): Monday is associated with the Moon (Chandra) and is considered a day of emotions, intuition, and nurturing. It is a good day for spending time with loved ones and connecting with one’s inner self.

Tuesday (Mangala Vara): Tuesday is associated with Mars (Mangal) and is considered a day of action, courage, and strength. It is a good day for physical activities and pursuing goals with determination and focus.

Wednesday (Budha Vara): Wednesday is associated with Mercury (Budha) and is considered a day of communication, learning, and intellectual pursuits. It is a good day for studying, writing, and engaging in mental activities.

Thursday (Guru Vara): Thursday is associated with Jupiter (Guru) and is considered a day of wisdom, abundance, and expansion. It is a good day for seeking knowledge, teaching, and engaging in philanthropic activities.

Friday (Shukra Vara): Friday is associated with Venus (Shukra) and is considered a day of love, beauty, and sensuality. It is a good day for connecting with loved ones, engaging in creative pursuits, and seeking harmony and balance.

Saturday (Shani Vara): Saturday is associated with Saturn (Shani) and is considered a day of discipline, hard work, and responsibility. It is a good day for planning and organizing, as well as for engaging in tasks that require patience and perseverance.

Understanding the energy and significance of each Vara can help in planning and scheduling important activities and events in one’s life. It is believed that activities performed on the appropriate Vara can bring success, good fortune, and blessings.


Nakshatra


Nakshatra is the constellation in which the Moon is located on a particular day. There are 27 Nakshatras, and each Nakshatra has a different ruling planet, symbol, and energy. Nakshatra is important for determining the auspicious time for starting a new project, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals. Each Nakshatra is associated with a particular energy, deity, and symbol and has its own unique significance and characteristics. Here is a brief overview of the 27 Nakshatras and their associated energies:

Ashwini: Symbolized by a horse’s head, Ashwini is associated with speed, healing, and initiation.

Bharani: Symbolized by a yoni or a female reproductive organ, Bharani is associated with fertility, birth, and creativity.

Krittika: Symbolized by a knife or a flame, Krittika is associated with transformation, purification, and courage.

Rohini: Symbolized by a chariot or a cow, Rohini is associated with nurturing, abundance, and beauty.

Mrigashirsha: Symbolized by a deer’s head, Mrigashirsha is associated with curiosity, exploration, and sensuality.

Ardra: Symbolized by a teardrop, Ardra is associated with purification, release, and transformation.

Punarvasu: Symbolized by a bow and a quiver of arrows, Punarvasu is associated with wisdom, abundance, and spiritual growth.

Pushya: Symbolized by a flower or a lotus, Pushya is associated with nurturing, protection, and nourishment.

Ashlesha: Symbolized by a coiled snake, Ashlesha is associated with transformation, healing, and renewal.

Magha: Symbolized by a throne or a royal court, Magha is associated with leadership, power, and authority.

Purva Phalguni: Symbolized by a hammock or a bed, Purva Phalguni is associated with love, romance, and sensuality.

Uttara Phalguni: Symbolized by a bed or a hammock, Uttara Phalguni is associated with creativity, inspiration, and manifestation.

Hasta: Symbolized by an open hand or a palm, Hasta is associated with skill, dexterity, and craftsmanship.

Chitra: Symbolized by a pearl or a diamond, Chitra is associated with beauty, creativity, and artistic expression.

Swati: Symbolized by a sword or a staff, Swati is associated with independence, freedom, and self-reliance.

Vishakha: Symbolized by a triumphal arch, Vishakha is associated with achievement, success, and victory.

Anuradha: Symbolized by a lotus, Anuradha is associated with friendship, loyalty, and devotion.

Jyeshtha: Symbolized by an earring or a talisman, Jyeshtha is associated with wisdom, power, and protection.

Mula: Symbolized by a root or a bunch of roots, Mula is associated with introspection, transformation, and liberation.

Purva Ashadha: Symbolized by a fan or a winnowing basket, Purva Ashadha is associated with determination, focus, and resilience.

Uttara Ashadha: Symbolized by a tusk or an elephant’s tusk, Uttara Ashadha is associated with power, strength, and authority.

Shravana: Symbolized by an ear or a hearing aid, Shravana is associated with learning, knowledge, and communication.

Dhanishta: Symbolized by a drum or a musical instrument, Dhanishta is associated with music, entertainment, and celebration.

Shatabhisha: Symbolized by a circle or a thousand physicians, Shatabhisha is associated with healing, rejuvenation, and renewal.

Purva Bhadrapada: Symbolized by a two-faced man, Purva Bhadrapada is associated with duality, balance, and transformation.

Uttara Bhadrapada: Symbolized by a serpent’s tail, Uttara Bhadrapada is associated with healing, transformation, and regeneration.

Revati: Symbolized by a fish or a drum, Revati is associated with compassion, empathy, and spiritual growth.

Understanding the energy and significance of each Nakshatra can help in selecting auspicious times for various activities and events, as well as gaining insight into one’s strengths, challenges, and spiritual path.


Yoga


Yoga is the combination of the position of the Sun and the Moon, which determines the energy of the day. There are 27 Yogas in a lunar month, each with a particular significance. Yoga is important for determining the auspicious time for starting a new project, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals. There are 27 Yogas in total, each with its own unique combination of planetary positions and energies.

Vishkumbha Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 4th, 8th or 12th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring stability, success, and good health.

Preeti Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 2nd, 5th, or 9th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring happiness, prosperity, and success in all endeavors.

Ayushman Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 3rd, 6th, or 11th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring good health, longevity, and prosperity.

Saubhagya Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 7th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring good fortune, happiness, and success in relationships.

Shobhana Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring success in career, fame, and recognition.

Atiganda Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 6th or 8th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring obstacles, delays, and difficulties.

Sukarma Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 4th, 7th, or 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring success, prosperity, and good karma.

Dhriti Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 2nd or 12th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring steadfastness, determination, and the ability to withstand challenges.

Shula Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 4th, 7th, or 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring sharpness, intelligence, and an analytical mind.

Ganda Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 6th, or 11th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring misfortune, obstacles, and delays.

Vriddhi Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 5th, or 9th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring growth, expansion, and success.

Dhruva Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 4th, 7th, or 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring stability, steadfastness, and the ability to achieve one’s goals.

Vyaghata Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 6th, or 11th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring obstacles, challenges, and disruptions.

Harshana Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 4th, 7th, or 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring happiness, joy, and contentment.

Vajra Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 4th, 7th, or 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring strength, power, and the ability to overcome obstacles.

Siddhi Yoga: This Yoga occurs when the Moon is in the 1st, 4th, 7th, or 10th house from the Sun. It is believed to bring success, achievement, and spiritual growth.

Vyatipata: Vyatipata yoga is associated with sudden changes and unexpected events. It is considered inauspicious for starting new ventures or making important decisions.

Variyan: This yoga is associated with valor and courage. It is considered auspicious for embarking on new endeavors and making bold decisions.

Parigha: Parigha yoga is associated with strength and protection. It is said to provide a protective shield against negative energies and is considered auspicious for warding off obstacles.

Shiva: This yoga is associated with spirituality and devotion. It is believed to enhance one’s connection with the divine and is considered auspicious for undertaking spiritual pursuits.

Siddha: Siddha yoga is associated with perfection and accomplishment. It is believed to bring about a sense of completeness and is considered auspicious for completing pending tasks.

Sadhya: This yoga is associated with attainment and success. It is said to help in achieving one’s goals and aspirations and is considered auspicious for new beginnings.

Shubha: Shubha yoga is associated with auspiciousness and good fortune. It is considered an auspicious time for new beginnings and is believed to bring about good luck and success.

Shukla: Shukla yoga is associated with purity and cleanliness. It is considered an auspicious time for performing religious and spiritual rituals and is said to enhance one’s spiritual growth.

Brahma: This yoga is associated with creation and creativity. It is believed to be an auspicious time for initiating new projects and is considered good for artistic pursuits.

Indra: Indra yoga is associated with power and influence. It is believed to enhance one’s leadership abilities and is considered auspicious for pursuing high-level positions or entering politics.

Vaidhriti: This yoga is considered inauspicious for beginning new endeavors or making important decisions. It is believed to be associated with obstacles and challenges.

The word “Yoga” means “union” or “connection”, and it is believed that the alignment of the Sun and Moon in certain configurations can create a powerful connection between the individual and the universe. Each Yoga has its own unique qualities and energies, and the position of the planets at the time of one’s birth can have a significant impact on their life and destiny.


Karana


Karana is half of a lunar day, or one-sixth of a Thithi. There are 11 Karanas, and each Karana has a different ruling planet and energy. Karana is important for determining the auspicious time for performing certain rituals.

Karana is an important aspect of the Panchang that is used to determine auspicious timings for various activities. It is a half-tithi or a lunar day, and there are a total of 11 Karanas. The first 7 Karanas are considered “Sakuni” or “inauspicious,” while the last 4 Karanas are considered “Chatushpada” or “auspicious.” Here is a brief explanation of each of the 11 Karanas.

Bava: This Karana is associated with initiating new activities and is considered inauspicious for concluding any work.

Balava: This Karana is associated with strength and vitality. It is considered auspicious for activities that require strength and endurance.

Kaulava: This Karana is associated with relationships and is considered auspicious for activities that involve socializing and meeting new people.

Taitila: This Karana is associated with laziness and is considered inauspicious for beginning any new work.

Gara: This Karana is associated with danger and is considered inauspicious for important activities.

Vanija: This Karana is associated with business and commerce. It is considered auspicious for activities related to commerce and trade.

Vishti: This Karana is associated with obstacles and is considered inauspicious for important activities.

Bhadra: This Karana is associated with wisdom and is considered auspicious for activities that require intelligence and knowledge.

Shakuni: This Karana is associated with deceit and is considered inauspicious for important activities.

Chatushpada: This Karana is associated with stability and is considered auspicious for activities that require stability and consistency.

Nagava: This Karana is associated with serpents and is considered inauspicious for important activities.

It is believed that starting a new activity during an auspicious Karana can bring about positive results, while starting an activity during an inauspicious Karana can bring about negative results. Hence, the Karana is an important aspect of the Panchang that people consult before beginning any new activity.


What is Rashi And Types of Rashi


Rashi is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the zodiac sign that the moon is in at the time of a person’s birth. There are 12 Rashis in total, and each Rashi is associated with a particular sign of the zodiac and has its own set of characteristics and traits. Here is a list of the 12 Rashis and the signs of the zodiac they are associated with:

Mesha Rashi (Aries): March 21 – April 19
Vrishabha Rashi (Taurus): April 20 – May 20
Mithuna Rashi (Gemini): May 21 – June 20
Karka Rashi (Cancer): June 21 – July 22
Simha Rashi (Leo): July 23 – August 22
Kanya Rashi (Virgo): August 23 – September 22
Tula Rashi (Libra): September 23 – October 22
Vrishchika Rashi (Scorpio): October 23 – November 21
Dhanu Rashi (Sagittarius): November 22 – December 21
Makara Rashi (Capricorn): December 22 – January 19
Kumbha Rashi (Aquarius): January 20 – February 18
Meena Rashi (Pisces): February 19 – March 20

Each Rashi is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Rashi that is prevailing on the day.


What is Ritu And Types of Ritu


Ritu is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the six seasons of the year. These seasons are determined by the movement of the sun and are based on the traditional Indian calendar. The six Ritus are as follows:

Vasanta Ritu (Spring): March – April
Grishma Ritu (Summer): May – June
Varsha Ritu (Monsoon): July – August
Sharad Ritu (Autumn): September – October
Hemanta Ritu (Pre-winter): November – December
Shishira Ritu (Winter): January – February

Each Ritu is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Ritu that is prevailing on the day.

In addition to the six Ritus, there is also a seventh Ritu called “Malma Ritu,” which is a transitional period between the end of one Ritu and the beginning of the next. During this time, the weather is usually changing and can be unpredictable. Malma Ritu is considered to be an inauspicious time for most activities and is generally avoided for important events and ceremonies.


What is Ayana And Types of Ayana


Ayana is a term used in Hindu astrology to refer to the two halves of the year, determined by the position of the sun in relation to the earth. The two Ayanas are as follows:

Uttarayana: This is the half of the year during which the sun is moving northward. It is considered to be an auspicious time for performing certain rituals and ceremonies. Uttarayana begins on the winter solstice and lasts until the summer solstice.

Dakshinayana: This is the half of the year during which the sun is moving southward. It is generally considered to be an inauspicious time for performing certain rituals and ceremonies. Dakshinayana begins on the summer solstice and lasts until the winter solstice.

Each Ayana is associated with a particular deity and has its own set of auspicious and inauspicious times. Hindus consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities based on the Ayana that is prevailing on the day.


What is Auspicious Muhurta


Auspicious muhurta, also known as “shubh muhurta” refers to a specific time that is considered to be particularly favorable or lucky for performing certain activities. In Hindu astrology, the Panchang is used to determine the most auspicious muhurtas for various events and ceremonies.

There are many factors that are taken into consideration when determining the most auspicious muhurta for an activity, including the position of the sun, moon, and other planets in the sky; the tithi, nakshatra, yoga, karana, vaara, and rashi that are prevailing on the day; and the ritu and ayana that are currently in effect. All of these factors can have an influence on the energy and auspiciousness of a particular time.

In Hindu astrology, muhurta refers to a specific time that is considered to be particularly favorable or lucky for performing certain activities. There are many different types of muhurtas that can be determined using the Panchang, the traditional Hindu calendar that is used to determine the most favorable times for various events and ceremonies. Some examples of the types of muhurtas that can be determined using the Panchang include:

Auspicious muhurta: This is a muhurta that is considered to be particularly favorable or lucky for performing certain activities. It is believed that performing certain activities during an auspicious muhurta can bring good luck and positive energy, while performing the same activities during an inauspicious muhurta can bring negative energy and bad luck.

Inauspicious muhurta: This is a muhurta that is considered to be particularly unfavorable or unlucky for performing certain activities. It is generally believed that it is best to avoid performing important activities during an inauspicious muhurta.


What is Inauspicious Muhurta


In Hindu astrology, ashubh muhurats, or inauspicious times, are considered to be times that are not favorable for starting new ventures, making important decisions, and performing certain rituals and ceremonies. In the Panchang, or traditional Hindu calendar, there are many different types of ashubh muhurats that can be determined based on various astrological influences.

Ashubh muhurats are believed to bring negative energy and bad luck, while shubh muhurats, or auspicious times, are believed to bring good luck and positive energy. Hindus often consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities.

Here are a few more examples of ashubh muhurats that can be determined using the Panchang:

Rahu Kalam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the planet Rahu in the sky.

Yama Gandam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the planet Yama in the sky.

Varjyam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the sun and the moon in the sky.

Durmuhurtam: This is a period of time that is considered to be particularly inauspicious for starting new ventures and for making important decisions. It is determined by the position of the planets in the sky.

In general, it is believed that performing certain activities during ashubh muhurats can bring negative energy and bad luck, while performing the same activities during shubh muhurats can bring good luck and positive energy. Hindus often consult the Panchang to determine the most auspicious times for various activities.


Why is Panchangam important?


Panchangam is important because it helps people choose the most auspicious time to begin new endeavors or perform important rituals. It is believed that performing actions during certain favorable periods can bring positive results and success. For example, a wedding performed during an auspicious date and time is believed to bring happiness and prosperity to the newlyweds.

Panchangam also provides information about important Hindu festivals and religious observances, as well as the timing of eclipses, planetary movements, and other celestial events. This helps people plan their daily lives and important events in accordance with the cosmic energies.

In summary, Panchangam is an important tool for Hindus to help them plan their lives in accordance with the lunar calendar and cosmic energies. It helps them choose the most auspicious dates and times for important events and can bring positive results and success.

Today Panchang 2023